Saturday February 9th, 2013 · by Annie

Gallery Updates: Movies, Photoshoots, Interviews

Hello everyone! Matt will be on House of Lies episode airing this sunday. Don’t miss it. I’ve done some gallery updates. Huge thanks to Kaci from ChristianSlaterFans.com for sending this wonderful stuff! Also thanks to Mila from david-morrissey.com for the Fotogramas scans. Plus some stuff I had here and never had a chance to upload before. Enjoy!

Photoshoots:

  • Photoshoots & Photocalls/Press Conferences > Photoshoot #055
  • Photoshoots & Photocalls/Press Conferences > Photoshoot #053
  • Photoshoots & Photocalls/Press Conferences > Photoshoot #021
  • Photoshoots & Photocalls/Press Conferences > Photoshoot #137
  • Photoshoots & Photocalls/Press Conferences > Photoshoot #136
  • Photoshoots & Photocalls/Press Conferences > Photoshoot #135


  • Magazines:

  • Magazine & Scans > The Improper Bostonian – December 12, 2012
  • Magazine & Scans > Total Film – November 2011
  • Magazine & Scans > Mini No.4 Russia – April 2011
  • Magazine & Scans > Flaunt
  • Magazine & Scans > Fotogramas Spain – March 2010
  • Magazine & Scans > GQ – January 2012
  • Magazine & Scans > American Cinematographer – March 2011
  • Magazine & Scans > Total Film – March 2012
  • Magazine & Scans > GQ – August 2007
  • Magazine & Scans > Entertainment Weekly – August 19-26, 2011
  • Magazine & Scans > Tatler Russia – April 2012
  • Magazine & Scans > Fast Company – July/August 2011
  • Magazine & Scans > A – September 2011
  • Magazine & Scans > Vanity Fair – February 2012
  • Magazine & Scans > Vanity Fair Italy – June 15, 2011
  • Magazine & Scans > Empire Russia – October 2011
  • Magazine & Scans > Elle – January 2012
  • Some Previews


    TV Shows:

  • TV Shows > Entourage > 6×12 – Give A Little Bit Screen Captures
  • TV Shows > Entourage > 6×12 – Give A Little Bit Stills
  • Movies:

  • Movies > Courage Under Fire > Stills
  • Movies > School Ties > Stills
  • Movies > The Good Old Boys > Stills
  • Movies > Good Will Hunting > Stills
  • Movies > The Zero Theorem > On Set
  • Interviews:

  • Interviews & Talk Shows > Jimmy Kimmel Live – January 25, 2013
  • Interviews & Talk Shows > Jimmy Kimmel Live – Screen Captures – January 25, 2013
  • Tags: Pictures
    Tuesday October 25th, 2011 · by Annie

    Matt Damon and Ben Affleck to work together again

    Looks like Matt Damon and Ben Affleck are going to work together again. News from CNN:

    Ben Affleck and Matt Damon are combining their star power once again.

    Studio Warner Bros. Pictures tells CNN that Affleck is set to direct as well as co-star along with Matt Damon in a film about infamous gangster Whitey Bulger. The yet-to-be-titled film will be produced by the Boston filmmakers as well, under their production company Pearl Street Films.

    Damon is signed on to portray Bulger, who was just recently apprehended after more than 16 years on the run.

    “Sopranos” and “Boardwalk Empire” scribe Terence Winter is taking care of the screenplay, which will chronicle Bulger’s journey from his “misspent youth” to becoming one of the most notorious criminals in history.

    The studio didn’t clarify what role Affleck will take on, but Deadline reports his brother Casey will also join the cast in a supporting role.

    According to the site, Affleck says that he and co-star Damon “have been looking for something to do together for some time. We’ve heard about Whitey Bulger since we were kids, and we are excited about the prospect of putting it on screen.”

    More articles about this:

  • E! Online
  • ABC News
  • CBS News
  • Get The Big Pictures
  • Zap2It
  • Boston Herald
  • Saturday May 28th, 2011 · by Annie

    Happy Feet 2 Trailer

    Remember George Miller? Dr. (as in physician) George Miller, the director who brought you ‘Mad Max,’ ‘Babe,’ ‘Lorenzo’s Oil’ and ‘Happy Feet’? Well, five years after he introduced dancing penguins to the world, he’s back with a ‘Happy Feet’ sequel titled, appropriately enough, ‘Happy Feet 2 in 3D.’ Set for a November 18 release, the film uses the voice talent of Elijah Wood, Robin Williams, Brad Pitt, Matt Damon, Hank Azaria, Alecia Moore (Pink) and Sofia Vergara. ‘Happy Feet’ charmed audiences of all ages with its story about the world of the Emperor Penguins — who find their soul mates through song — into which a penguin is born who cannot sing … But he could tap dance something fierce. The sequel takes the next logical step — the hero of the first film has a son who is dance shy. Warner Bros. has just released a teaser trailer — to coincide with the release of ‘Kung Fu Panda 2.’

    Synopsis:

    The eagerly anticipated sequel to the Oscar-winning hit Happy Feet Two finds tap-dancing penguin Mumble and his pals using their smooth moves to save the penguin nation. Mumble and Gloria (voice of Pink) have started a family of their own. Mumble, The Master of Tap, has a problem because tiny son Erik is choreo-phobic. Reluctant to dance, Erik runs away and encounters The Mighty Sven — a penguin who can fly!! Mumble has no hope of competing with this charismatic new role model. But things get worse when the world is shaken by powerful forces. Erik learns of his father’s “guts and grit” as Mumble brings together the penguin nations and all manner of fabulous creatures — from tiny Krill to giant Elephant Seals – to put things right.

    Source

    Friday May 13th, 2011 · by Annie

    Martin Scorsese Trying to Edit Kenneth Lonergan’s ‘Margaret’ Out of Limbo

    This year, movies like Battle: Los Angeles, I Am Number Four, Hoodwinked 2 (did anyone even see the first one?), another Tyler Perry movie, Red Riding Hood, and the Justin Bieber documentary all easily made their way into theaters. Know what hasn’t come out this year (or the past couple) while films like Something Borrowed get their big studio pushes?

    Margaret.

    Kenneth Lonergan‘s follow-up to his brilliant debut, You Can Count on Me, has had a notoriously rough time making it to theaters, both due to legal issues and a dispute over final cut.

    The film was shot almost six years ago. The editing process has been called a nightmare. Lonergan has a three-hour cut that Fox Searchlight isn’t too keen on releasing. Why? Because they won’t release a version over two hours long. Lonergan has final cut, which hasn’t made the situation any easier. Great talents such as Thelma Schoonmaker, Martin Scorsese, Scott Rudin, and Sydney Pollack did passes on the film to get it down to a shorter length.

    And right now, Scorsese is doing another edit of the film with Lonergan.

    I was lucky enough to speak with the movie’s co-star Mark Ruffalo yesterday for his directorial debut, Sympathy for Delicious, and of course, I had to ask about Margaret. Ruffalo described the three-hour cut he saw as a “masterpiece” and explained that “it’s a love letter to a post-9/11 America and New York City.”

    You’d think a film of that possible caliber and with a cast including Matt Damon, Anna Paquin, Matthew Broderick, Jean Reno, Kieran Culkin, Olivia Thirlby, and Ruffalo would be a sure thing for awards season, but sadly, that’s been proven incorrect over the past few years. The reality that a bold talent like Lonergan has to fight this hard to get this film released is a truly sad commentary on commerce kicking art’s ass.

    Here’s part of my exchange with Ruffalo on the status of Lonergan’s long-awaited film:

    When will we actually be able to see Margaret?

    Ruffalo: [Sighs] Oh, it’s so… I don’t know. Marty Scorsese has come on now to do a pass on it with Kenneth. It was a movie that started at 186 pages. It was just a very, very finely interwoven piece of material and it’s so beautiful. When he tried to cut it down, he had a very hard time. The studio was saying they wanted no more than two hours, and the rough cut I saw was a little bit over three hours long. It was absolutely incredible. It was beautiful, moving, and such a fine piece of work on so many levels. It was beautifully shot, beautifully acted, and the writing is incredible. It’s a love story to a post-9/11 America and New York City.

    He couldn’t get it cut down. He had a really hard time. The studio, basically, said they weren’t going to release it. That’s where it’s been. It got tied up in lawsuits with Gary Gilbert, who tried to take the movie away and have someone else edit it behind Kenny’s back. It was a surreal, big, ugly thing. Now Kenny has got it and Marty is kinda arbitrating his cut. Hopefully, we’ll be seeing it soon.

    Source

    Friday May 13th, 2011 · by Annie

    Matt Damon to Make His Directorial Debut with Father Daughter Time?

    First time you hear Father Daugher Time, it sounds like one of those titles on posts where they are shooting big projects at everyday locations (remember Rory’s First Kiss?). But alas, this title is true to its name and is already considered a huge project. Father Daughter Time: A Tale of Armed Robbery and Eskimo Kisses, written by Matthew Alrdich, is about a man who goes on the lam with his daughter on a three-state crime spree. This film is already under the watchful eye of various studios with one ahead of the four.

    Deadline is reporting that Warner Brothers, Paramount Pictures, Relativity Media, Walter Parkes, and Matt Damon and Chris Moore have made offers to buy the script. But Warner Brothers has already made the moves to be the one studio with the exclusive rights to produce the pic, with Matt Damon likely to star in and make his directorial debut.

    According to the site, Alrdich wasn’t looking for making a deal and just wanted to make a movie. With five parties vying for the rights of the film, it looks as though he got more than he bargined for. But the scribe said that “The script is not high concept, it’s a smallish, very personal, dark but playful road movie about a father and daughter.”

    Intially Alrdich was worried that his script would become a big budget film and he wants to keep it in the spirit of the indie film. But with the possibility of Matt Damon being involved in both an acting and directing capacity, there is a chance that it could stay true to Alrdich’s vision.

    When one of the biggest movie stars in the world, who also happens to be an Academy Award-winning screenwriter, gets on the phone with your client and offers to protect the writer’s vision and opens his hand to be a creative partner, it’s hard to say no,” Ross said. “The money becomes secondary. This script is not the obvious studio movie. There are no explosions. It will require delicate handling. Avoiding years of development hell was our goal.

    Considering that Damon has starred in some of the biggest and smallest projects with some of the best directors in Hollywood, one has to wonder what we can expect from the actor should he decide to direct. It’s possible that we could see some Coen Brothers, George Clooney, and Clint Eastwood influences on this film, and I think this small indie film is perfect way for the actor to to possible kick start his directing career.

    Source

    Friday May 13th, 2011 · by Annie

    Warner Bros Buys Hot Spec, Matt Damon Circles As Star And Director

    EXCLUSIVE: In a $500,000 against $800,000 deal, Warner Bros is finalizing a deal to acquire Father Daughter Time: A Tale of Armed Robbery and Eskimo Kisses, the Matthew Aldrich spec that Deadline told you yesterday had five bids on the table. The deal is just happening, and I expect the next development to be that Matt Damon is working on this picture as its star and also eyeing it as potentially the one on which he’ll make his feature directing debut. He will also produce through his WB-based company Pearl Street, with partner Ben Affleck, Chris Moore and Drew Vinton also producing.

    This has been a spec auction with some big twists and turns, because one of the bids that rivaled the one from Warner Bros was made by Damon and Moore, with money from a private financier. Other bids came in from Paramount (with JJ Abrams attached to produce), Fox (for Peter Chernin), Mandate, Walter Parkes through his discretionary fund, with Relativity Media and others also in the mix.

    The script focuses on a man who goes on the lam with his daughter, his accomplice on a three-state crime spree.

    CAA, Aldrich’s manager Jewerl Ross and attorney Jamie Feldman were working on the auction all day yesterday and by last night, it looked like Damon and Moore would land the deal, but this morning Warner Bros upped the ante. Since the studio has a first-look deal that Damon made with his and Moore’s former Live Planet partner Affleck, it shouldn’t be a difficult maneuver to plug Damon right into the center of the film.

    This is a strong spec sale at a time when not a lot of money is being paid in the marketplace for scripts that don’t come with attachments. Adrich said that he wrote his script on and off, putting it down when he was hired on assignment and picking it back up. “The spec road wasn’t really the plan, I finished the draft, gave it to my manager and new agents, who loved it, and the idea was to attach a director,” he said. “It took off from there.” While specs are considered the riskiest form of employment right now, Aldrich said it has worked well for him.

    “The one film I’ve had produced was a spec, so I guess I’m batting 2 for 2,” he said. “Specs are turning out to be a pretty good business model. But the idea wasn’t to make a deal, it was to make a movie. The script is not high concept, it’s a smallish, very personal, dark but playful road movie about a father and daughter.”

    The reason they were heading for the independent offer, according to Ross, was becasue they wanted to protect the vision of the film and feared that would be difficult at a studio. But they sparked to the continued involvement of Damon, who has pledged just that.

    “When one of the biggest movie stars in the world, who also happens to be an Academy Award-winning screenwriter, gets on the phone with your client and offers to protect the writer’s vision and opens his hand to be a creative partner, it’s hard to say no,” Ross said. “The money becomes secondary. This script is not the obvious studio movie. There are no explosions. It will require delicate handling. Avoiding years of development hell was our goal.”

    Source

    Tags: Movie News
    Monday February 21st, 2011 · by Annie

    Matt Damon on Soderbergh and Smith “retiring”

    A sure way to get a laugh out of “Adjustment Bureau” star Matt Damon these days is to mention that oddly, two directors whose only link in this world is having both worked with Damon more than once have both announced seemingly premature “retirements” from movie making.

    The quixotic and generally quite successful Steven Soderbergh seems to mean it. With Kevin Smith, who has had a lot of trouble getting his latest movie made and into theaters, it’s hard to tell. But both have announced a one-or-two-more movies and done career path.

    So is working with Damon and the memory of Matt what drove both over the edge, and will Matt be in either filmmaker’s “final” film?

    “I hope to be in both of their last movies,” Damon says. “But I hope neither one of them is making his last movie NOW. I hope not. I hope not. We need good directors.

    “I’ve talked at length with Steven about it. He is going away for a while, I think. He genuinely wants to paint. And he feels if he really dedicates himself he can be really good. He’s not yet 50. He will put in the hours. He has a work ethic like nobody I’ve ever seen. He feels if he puts a hard decade of work in, he could really be doing something.

    “But I see it as a waste of this incredible depth of knowledge of filmmaking. But his thing is ‘form. I’m only interested in what I can do with form. I’ve made almost every movie I want to,’ he says. ‘And if I see another over-the-shoulder shot, I’m going to kill myself.’

    “I said to him, right after I did ‘Invictus,’ ‘Steven, I just finished a movie with a guy in his 70s who still charges out of bed every morning because he can’t wait to get to the set. He has a blast and is really loving it and he’s been doing it a lot longer than either of us.’ And without a blink, Steven says ‘But Clint’s a storyteller. A great storyteller. I’m not interested in stories. I’m interested in form.’

    “I don’t know what to say to that. It’s his life to do with what he wants. So in the meantime, I’d doing as many movies with him as I can. I’ve definitely got him on the hook for one more. Hopefully, on the set of ‘Liberace’ I can convince him to do another one.

    “This ‘Liberace’ script is just wonderful. Michael’s going to be just phenomenal in that part. We’re shooting that in 2012. I just did ‘Contagion’ with Steven last December.

    “He has the most varied body of work of anybody I can think of. He’s at this point where we could shoot during the day, and him being the cinematographer and the director, we’d go home, have an hour or two off, and then meet him back at the hotel bar in Chicago. They’d have a back room where he’d sit, have some pretzels and a drink and he’d take a look at the day’s work. Scott Burns, the writer, Greg Jacobs, his first-AD, and me, we’d show up, get a drink and hang out with him. Steven would have his headphones on, sitting at his laptop. And in about 20 minutes he’d cut together the day’s work. ‘OK,’ he’d say, pull his headphones off and turn the computer around and show us, right there, what we’d shot that day and how it would look on the big screen when the movie comes out. THAT FAST. He’s a FREAK.

    “When we did ‘Ocean’s Twelve,’ we did a wrap party at a bowling alley. I went up to him and said, ‘Hey Steven, thanks. Great time working with you. Thanks. How do you think the movie’s going to be?’ And he say, ‘You wanna SEE it?’ He’d finished cutting it and had it on a laptop. Right there, he shows me the movie!’ (LAUGHS)

    “He’s a phenomenal director, a prodigious talent with a non-stop brilliant mind. He’s been pushing himself since the very beginning. Sometimes failing, but always pushing.”

    Damon is “a little miffed, frankly” at the “Oscar snub” his pal and sometime collaborator Ben Affleck seems to have gotten over “The Town.”

    “Don’t get me started, but he did such a great job writing and directing that, and acting in it. At least some acknowledgement for the screenplay. And there are ten best picture nominees, It wasn’t one of the ten best? I think so. Anyway, he’s hot as a firecracker right now. I’m glad to see it.”

    I’m interviewing The Farrelly Brothers on Friday about “Hall Pass,” their new comedy. Damon and Greg Kinnear played conjoined twins in their comedy, “Stuck on You” some years back. Damon has a vivid recollection of working with those guys, too.

    “My favorite direction I’ve ever receieved was from Peter Farrelly. Greg and I were wearing the suit, stuck together. We do a take and it just doesn’t work. I’d flubbed a line, Greg missed one of his cues and there was this long pause after we hear “Cut” over the walkie-talkies. They were sitting way over in Video Village, where the monitors were. Must have been a quarter of a mile away.

    “And Greg goes, ‘Well that stunk. Let’s just go right away’ We were hoping they’d keep the cameras rolling and we’d take another shot at the scene.

    “But we see Peter walking all the way over to the set. Long walk. Greg says, ‘Oh nooo. He’s coming ALL the way over just to give us a note. Not good.’

    “Peter’s chewing gum. And he finally gets over to us, looks at me, looks down at his feet, takes a long pause, ‘Um, yeah, hmmmm.’ Looks back up at me and finally just says — ‘Suck less!’”

    Damon laughs.

    “Greg and I go ‘Yeah, THANKS Peter. We got it.’ He turns around and walks all the way back to the monitors.”

    Source

    Tuesday January 4th, 2011 · by Annie

    Matt Damon enjoys being ‘a true nincompoop’ in ‘True Grit’

    The actor has wanted to work with the Coen brothers for years and got his chance as the verbose Texas Ranger LaBoeuf in the western remake.

    On a clear New Mexico morning this year, Matt Damon sat and watched the Coen brothers and the crew of “True Grit” as they prepared horses, six-shooters and the camera for the next scene. With more than three dozen feature films under his belt, it could have been just another mundane moment between close-ups, but instead Damon holds on to the snapshot memory with scrapbook affection.

    “We were halfway through the movie and I was sitting on the set, we were doing this corn dodger scene — the characters are throwing these little cornbread cakes up in the air and shooting at them, it’s ridiculous — and it really hit me,” Damon recalled. “I turned to [cinematographer] Roger Deakins — he and I go back, we worked on ‘Courage Under Fire’ in the 1990s — and I said to him, ‘Roger, this is really special, right?,’ and he smiled and he said, ‘Yeah, it really is.’”

    “True Grit” has just arrived in theaters as an idiosyncratic gun-smoke adventure with characters who talk like prophets as they ride through rivers, snow and ravines in search of revenge and reward. It’s the first visit to the Old West by the Coens — the Oscar-winning filmmakers best known for “No Country for Old Men” and “Fargo” — and their cast is led by a grizzled Jeff Bridges, the young newcomer Hailee Steinfeld and Damon, who plays a Texas Ranger who may be more windbag than Winchester.

    “I am,” Damon declared with mock pride, “a true nincompoop in this movie.”

    “True Grit” presents the story of a 14-year-old girl (Steinfeld) who hires a battered and boozy U.S. marshal named “Rooster” Cogburn (Bridges) to hunt down the dim outlaw ( Josh Brolin) who murdered her father. Tagging along on the manhunt is Damon’s Lone Star lawman, LaBoeuf (pronounced “la beef”), who fits in nicely with the Coens’ long cinematic parade of quirky and feckless souls.

    That’s not to say that LaBoeuf doesn’t have his moments of valor. Joel and Ethan Coen, though, have stacked the deck against the character; their script is far more faithful to the 1968 novel by Charles Portis than the first Hollywood adaptation (which was released in 1969 and won an Oscar for John Wayne in the Cogburn role), but there is a major added scene of comedic mayhem that leaves the verbose LaBoeuf sputtering blood.

    Damon can barely recount the filming of the scene without seizing up with laughter and a bit of lingering horror as well. Without giving too much away, LaBoeuf suffers a significant tongue injury and Cogburn, announcing that he once knew a teamster with a similar injury, reaches down to rip away the flap of flesh. On the set, Joel Coen advised Damon to really enunciate his dialogue, and on the big screen it’s hard to forget Damon’s stricken expression in the moment.

    “It’s such a horrible situation, blood is gushing out of my mouth, I’ve been shot and there’s this guy sticking his filthy hand in my mouth, ‘I will rip it free,’ and I’m trying to get him to stop, and as soon as they yell ‘cut’ we just fall down laughing,” Damon said. “It was that kind of stuff. I would come home and tell my wife, ‘I am having so much fun on this movie.’”

    Damon reserved a special brand of praise for Bridges, the 61-year-old star who grew up in Hollywood, put together decades of integrity work and now is enjoying a new stratum of acclaim as a celebrated elder statesmen.

    “When he works and things are clicking like they were on this film, he’s in a state of just pure joy, and you can feel it, everyone can,” Damon said. “It was a relief in a way too. When you work with someone you really respect and admire, you always have that worry that they’ll be a [a jerk]. To have him show up and live up to his reputation in every way and be so wonderful, it made it all memorable. He’s a good guy, and that’s what you want him to be.”

    And if Damon had to list the people who weren’t the good guys as he had hoped? The 40-year-old actor let out a sharp laugh. “That’s at the end of my career. Can I call you back on that one?”

    Damon was speaking by phone from frosty Chicago, and he was in no hurry to hang up. The wind outside was too frigid, the hotel room too quiet and his wife and children too far away. “It’s like 10 degrees here, I’m not going anywhere,” said the father of three, “and it’s nice to have a grown-up conversation any time.”

    The Illinois visit was for “Contagion,” the Steven Soderbergh pandemic thriller that also stars Marion Cotillard, Gwyneth Paltrow, Kate Winslet, Laurence Fishburne, Elliott Gould and Jude Law. “It’s an ensemble movie because, you know, everybody is dropping like flies.” Damon will reunite with Soderbergh for the biopic “Liberace,” which has Michael Douglas slated for the lead role and Damon as the music star’s lover. The Cambridge, Mass., native is also reportedly in talks to star in the sci-fi film “Elysium,” from “District 9″ director Neill Blomkamp.

    Damon has become a signature Hollywood star for his generation after the Jason Bourne films, two Oscar nominations for acting (“Good Will Hunting” and “Invictus”) and his work with directors such as Steven Spielberg, Martin Scorsese, Clint Eastwood and Soderbergh. There’s also his winking appearances on “30 Rock” and his ongoing comedy feud with Jimmy Kimmel and his good-karma portrayal in the tabloids as an earnest family man and co-founder of Water.org, which champions the cause of safe drinking water and sanitation in impoverished regions.

    It was 13 years ago this month that Damon found his real breakthrough with the release of “Good Will Hunting,” which he starred in with Robin Williams and Ben Affleck. Damon and Affleck won Oscars for the script. That film followed the good notices Damon earned a year earlier in “Courage Under Fire” and was followed in short order by Damon’s successes in “The Rainmaker” and “Saving Private Ryan.”

    Damon has a flinty American everyman quality that he can play against — as he does as the haunted-soul assassin in “The Bourne Identity” — or channel with unexpected tints, as he did this year in Eastwood’s “Hereafter.” “He’s a gem to work with,” Eastwood said. “He has this reticent Americana persona on screen, and he brings a lot to the set with his writing background and insights.”

    Bridges echoed those sentiments: “For ‘Grit,’ he took this character and just ran off with it. He’s a guy that does terrific work and makes good choices, and that’s a big thing in the long haul of a career.”

    For years, Damon has wanted to work with the Coens. Back when Damon was working on the 1999 film “The Talented Mr. Ripley,” he would lean forward as Philip Seymour Hoffman told tales of Coen filmmaking. The actors were especially impressed by the Coens’ tradition of giving their cast a daily visual aid by distributing the sketches of storyboard artist J. Todd Anderson.

    “Phil had just done ‘The Big Lebowski’ with them, and he was telling me how every day on a Coen set when they hand out the sides — the miniature version of script pages for the day — they also hand out the boards,” Damon said. “You can look at the movie, in a sort of cartoon form, and know what all the shots are. Phil was like, ‘You’re not even going to believe it if you work with them, because you not only know what the scene will look like but you know what shots you will be in.’ That gives you so much as an actor.”

    The flip side of that, Damon suspected, was that the shoot would be intensely regimented and perhaps even smothering when it came to improvisation. “But really what happened is they are so deep into the material by the time they actually are on the set shooting that they aren’t afraid to improvise,” the actor said. “They were pretty loose. We had a lot of fun out there.”

    If Damon were describing his LaBoeuf character to one of his young daughters he might use a “Toy Story” example — the Texas Ranger dresses like Sheriff Woody but acts like the doofus do-gooder Buzz Lightyear. Damon said he and Joel Coen came to the idea of making the cowboy a sort of Cliff Clavin of the Old West by modeling him on Texas actor Tommy Lee Jones but subtracting the notable fact that Jones is a Harvard-educated intellect.

    “The plan was a Tommy Lee who didn’t know what he was talking about — and never stopped talking,” Damon said. “And to practice for the tongue [injury] I actually took one of my daughter’s ponytail bands — one of her hair ties — and just wrapped it around my tongue to try to get this way of talking down. I’m sure the neighbors heard me and just shook their head and thought, ‘This whole Hollywood thing has just gotten to him.’”

    By Geoff Boucher, Los Angeles Times. Source

    Tags: True Grit